Archive by Author

Lost and Found


It’s a good thing Vicki Belanger hasn’t moved house in seventeen years.

You see, seventeen years ago, Belanger’s siser, Valerie Lynch was putting sunscreen on her two very small children and her young nephew, all of whom were under the age of five, before heading off to a waterfront outing. She was doing this in Belanger’s back yard. As a precaution, she slipped off her wedding and engagement rings and put them aside on a platform next to the swing set.

Unfortunately, she forgot to put her rings back on before they left.

When Lynch discovered her rings were missing, she raced back to her sister’s house only to find… she couldn’t find them. About a year and a half later, Belanger found Lynch’s wedding ring, but not the diamond engagement ring.

And that’s where matters stood until October 28 of this year. By then, Belanger had met up with Kent Blethen, a jewelry hunting enthusiast. Belanger told him of her sister’s missing ring and Blethen offered to help her look for it.
(more…)

Paper Dolling: Is This Happening?

An article by Sandy Malone was published by HuffPo the other day. In it, she tells the harrowing story of a client of her wedding planning service and what happened to her when she went shopping at an unnamed bridal salon in Waltham, Mass.

According to Malone, the bride informed the salon of her size (though I have to say I’m puzzled as to why an ‘average sized’ woman should have to do that) and was told it would be ‘no problem.’ I should certainly hope there would be no problem fitting an average sized woman in a reasonably well-stocked bridal salon. And while samples rarely fit brides precisely, there certainly ought to be a few gowns in a size close enough that a woman can try some things on to get a general idea of how they might look on her.

Apparently, this was not the case.

It seems that what the salon did instead of putting an ill-fitting dress on the bride and asking her to use her imagination as to how it will look when it is properly fitted, the consultant took the gown and began pinning it to the bride’s undergarments in front… in a tiny room with mirrors on three sides and only a flimsy curtain on the fourth wall. This process, apparently, is called ‘paper dolling.’ To add insult to injury, when the bride’s friends wanted to see what the consultants were oohing and ahing over in that tiny cubicle, one of them simply threw open the curtain, exposing the bride’s panty-clad backside to all and sundry without warning.

The bride, of course, was pretty traumatized by this experience, as would be any right-thinking person. Paper dolling sounds pretty useless. After all, a dress needs to be seen in three dimensions to get the full effect, and wedding gowns in particular need to be seen from the back, because during the ceremony, chances are that’s what your friends and family will be seeing the most of. Most bridal couples do stand facing the officiant who faces the witnesses.

On top of that, the sudden and completely insensitive near-indecent exposure of the bride was appalling. You ask first whether the bride wishes to show off the dress she’s trying on, and if it’s not actually on her, this is an extra vital step.

Malone winds up the article with a warning to all brides to shun this pernicious practice, which is excellent advice. I, too, would counsel brides not to allow a salon to ‘paper doll’ them into a dress.

But here’s the interesting thing. When I googled the term and several variations on it… I got only Malone’s original article from two days ago, and a whole lot of articles about making or collecting actual paper dolls. Is this one shop in Waltham the one place in the world that does this? Is there another reason the term might not get a lot of hits in bridal terms?

Has anyone out there heard about this anywhere else? Known someone subjected to it? Survived the experience themselves?

Curiouser and curiouser.

Marriage Equality Wins in Landslide!

Four states had ballot measures concerning same sex marriage in yesterday’s election, along with that trivial electing the president thing. Guess what? Equality won!

Maine and Maryland became the first two states in the USA to choose marriage equality by voter referendum. Maine reversed a 2009 referendum that banned same sex marriage, while Maryland voted to accept the state law in favor of same sex marriage that was passed earlier this year.

Washington state looks likely to make it a triad, with another vote to accept a law passed earlier this year. When last I saw the numbers, a little over half the votes had been counted and the tally was running 52% – 48% in favor. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that it continues in that vein.

And while they aren’t making it exactly legal yet, Minnesota voters have refused to amend their state constitution to ban same sex marriage.

Here’s to many lovely weddings, whether they involve one bride and one groom, two grooms, or two brides!

Love should always triumph.

The Fiddly Bits Around the Edges


I always had a sneaking understanding of Slartibartfast, the planet designer from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. He loved the ‘fiddly bits’ like fjords. I, too, love fiddly bits.

And so I’m going to cover a couple fiddly bits most bridal blogs don’t usually talk about: those tiny details that make getting ready on the day of so much easier and less stressful.

For one thing, here’s the deal with how to deal with your rings. On the big day, slide your engagement ring off your left hand and transfer it to the right until after the ceremony. The wedding band is properly placed on a naked finger, and worn closer to your heart afterward.
(more…)

Quickie Question: Photo Opt Out?

When you’re getting married, there’s a long list of shots your photographer expects to take. Bride alone, groom alone, bride with her family, groom with his family, the cake, the happy couple with each family, the happy couple alone, the getaway car, the first dance, the bridesmaids, the groomsmen… yeah, it’s a very long list these days.

And then there’s the stuff like this. Okay, I get the sentimental delight of a picture of the mother of the bride putting the final fluff on the veil or the maid of honor giving a final adjustment to the train right before the bride leaves the proverbial if not actual arms of her family to become one with her new spouse. But does anyone really need to immortalize the awkward shimmy that got her into her pouffy petticoats? Is it really necessary to have photographic evidence of what the bride looks like in curlers and the vestiges of the masque she wore to bed to tighten her skin for her big day on camera? How many brides find themselves in need of tranquilizers because they invited a photographer to snap lots of pictures just when they’re at their least put together and most nervous?

Or how about the now ubiquitous shots of the wedding party’s feet? I know how this one got started. Some couple out there wore really spectacular footwear and the picture of their shoes got passed around, and a trend was born. I get that. And if you’re wearing really neat shoes or have a truly fabulous mendhi (henna tattoo), I can certainly see wanting photographic evidence. But those shoes up there? Was there any need to immortalize those? They’re pretty darn off the rack.

Those are my personal least favorite ‘must have’ shots. What about you? What would you least want someone taking pictures of on your wedding day? Would the traditional family shots devolve into potential violence? Do you detest the rings on the Bible throwing the heart-shaped shadow? What do you not want photographed on your wedding day?

Some People Just Have the Right Attitude


Hurricane Sandy has caused untold devastation on the East Coast. There are still people without shelter, power, adequate safe food and water. The full cost will not be known for a while, and rebuilding will take a long time.

Still, there are some bright spots, some feel good stories starting to come out of the horror and loss. One of these stories is a couple named Shelley Ebert and Adam Moser. Their wedding was scheduled for yesterday, and Ebert wrote a piece for HuffPo Weddings about how Sandy has changed their plans.

Change them it did… but where there are women – and men – who would be mourning the loss of their perfect flowers and screaming that the bridesmaid who hadn’t yet picked up her dress when the storm hit can’t be in the wedding, either, this couple doesn’t care about what isn’t going to be there. They’re more concerned with who will be there, what they still have, and in looking forward to spending their one-year anniversary running the New York Marathon together, weather permitting.

The lesson here is that ultimately it’s not about the trappings, lovely and fun though they are. It’s about sharing your love, being surrounded by people who support you, and taking an amazing leap of faith into your own future.

And that, my friends, can be done even in the middle of an actual disaster.

How Low Can You Go?

This is the late Amy Winehouse on her wedding day. Note the anchor printed cotton sundress she wore.

It’s been stolen.

That and a Moschino newsprint cocktail dress she wore in an appearance on the Jools Holland show were both stolen from the late singer’s Camden home.

How low does one have to stoop in order to steal a dead woman’s wedding gown?

To make matters worse, the wedding dress was scheduled to be auctioned off in New York next month to raise money for the Amy Winehouse Foundation. It was expected to sell for pretty big bucks, too, considering its purpose in Winehouse’s life.

To whomever did this: shame on you! You’ve just taken away a lot of funding from a charity to help people overcome addiction. And always remember: karma runs over dogmas.

Page 4 of 108« First...«23456»102030...Last »